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What is a Pilot Aptitude Test?

Airlines and other employers in the aviation industry have a large pool of aspiring pilots to choose from, so they take only the best. Aptitude tests are used early in the job application process to eliminate most candidates from consideration. In order to be offered an interview, you will need to be one of the very top scorers on the test. Just one test question can determine whether you continue in the employment process. Practicing with JobTestPrep’s tailor-made drills, study guides and test simulations can help you earn a top score and get your career off the ground.

Pilot aptitude tests do not directly test applicants’ ability to pilot aircraft. Rather, the tests focus on general skills needed by pilots in order to succeed, such as literacy, numeracy, spatial reasoning, social skills, and work under pressure. This means that you do not need any experience as a pilot to do well on the test and even years of flying experience will not necessarily translate into a better score.


Why is the Test Challenging?

Pilot aptitude tests are challenging for three main reasons:

1. Questions are structured as puzzles to test your reasoning ability, not as tests of how well you understand specific information.

2. The test likely will not resemble the tests you took in school. Spatial reasoning and situational judgment questions are especially different from those on academic tests.

3. There is intense time pressure to answer questions quickly.


How will Preparing for the Test Advance My Career?

You will need a top aptitude test score just to get your foot in the door at a major airline or other employer in the aviation industry. Once you have been hired by a good airline, you will enjoy unparalleled job security and opportunities for advancement. Pilots at major airlines enjoy good working conditions and considerable benefits, and in many cases are organised into strong unions. Pilots who fly charter flights or work for minor airlines often experience low pay, difficult working conditions and limited opportunities for advancement.

According to the British government's National Career Service, there is large variation in airline pilot pay based on employer and experience. A new pilot flying charter flights or working for a minor airline might earn as little as £20,000 per year, while a more experienced pilot working for a major airlines might earn £140,000 per year or more. Scoring high on the test is the very first step to advance to the higher levels of the profession rather than getting stuck at the bottom.


How Can a High Score Help Me Pay for Training?

High pilot aptitude test scores are essential for admission to special training programs that pay for some or all of your flight training. It is extremely expensive to pay for flight training out of pocket. Commercial pilots are required to hold an Airline Transport Pilot Licence, which requires extensive training. The cost of commercial pilot training may range from £40,000 and £120,000, depending on the program you attend and the types of aircraft you learn to fly. Pilots who start their career in the RAF get free training on the condition that they complete a term of service, but the RAF only accepts pilots who pass highly rigorous testing. If you score high, many airlines and other employers in the industry will subsidize your training and offer structured repayment during your first few years on the job—a much better proposition than taking out personal loans.


Pilot Exam Free Practice with Full Solutions

Most pilot aptitude tests cover a variety of different topics including numerical reasoning, verbal reasoning, spatial awareness and mechanical reasoning. Our free test contains 10 questions and was designed to give you a taste of what to expect when taking the real thing. To further mimic real test conditions, you will be given 10 minutes to complete the questions presented. These questions are samples from our Pilot Aptitude PrepPacks™ that was developed by expert test designers. Each question represents a part of the test you will likely encounter.

If you don't feel like taking a 10-minute test right now, take a glance through the free sample questions below. These sample questions also show you examples of the thorough solutions and explanations provided for every question in the Preppacks™.

 

Pilot Abstract Reasoning Sample Question

Choose the odd one out:

Pilot Exam Sample Question 1

Answer: 5

free-pilot-abstract-answer-1

 

The logic: In each square, a certain shape appears several times. The shape’s size may vary, though there is always one shape which is distinctively larger. The number of shapes in a box corresponds to the number of sides of each shape. For example, option two is comprised of diamonds. A diamond has four sides and thus, there are four diamonds in the box. Option five is the odd one out because it does not follow this established rule. A star has 10 sides and there are 5 (not 10) stars in the box.

When looking at the patterns presented focus on the following features:

Number of shapes in each pattern, type of shapes in each pattern, sizes, colors, arrangements and direction of shapes, etc. Then by carefully observing the patterns try to notice which pattern stands out with respect to one or more of the features you examined previously. It doesn't necessarily have to be a prominent difference, but rather may be just a small one.

Pilot Numerical Reasoning Sample Question

Admittedly, absolute numbers of committed forces per nation in NATO are seen by some as presenting an unfair comparison. Some analysts say that percentages of population and the gross domestic product are a far better assessment. If the fact that the world’s largest collective GDP can’t handle the task is not enough, let’s take a look at the nations involved. The French defence budget is 1.8 percent of GDP, the British is 2.2 percent the U.S. is 4 percent, a lot more than the 1.2 percent of Germany.

Which country has the highest defence budget, as percent of its GDP?

A. France

B. Britain

C. Germany

D. USA

Word problems may be filled with information that is not entirely relevant to answering the question. This extra information is meant to distract you and get you to use up precious time. For example, all the information necessary to answer this question is contained in the the last sentence of the paragraph: "The French defence budget is 1.8 percent of GDP, the British is 2.2 percent the U.S. is 4 percent, a lot more than the 1.2 percent of Germany. Which country has the highest defence budget, as percent of its GDP?"


Learn to distinguish important from unimportant information and focus only on the relevant information.
Notice what you're being asked and highlight relevant data (participants, numbers, units of measurement, raw data or standardized data, ratios etc.)

Pilot Percentages Sample Question

The price of a book before a 25% discount is £10.

What is the price of the book after the discount?

£2.5

£7.5

£6.25

£8.5

When dealing with numerical questions, notice the math topic you are asked about (in this case, percentages). Understand the meaning of the data provided to you, what you are asked and how to use this data correctly in your calculations in order to correctly solve the question. For example, in the question above you are given the book's price before a 25% discount and you are asked for its price after the discount.

Refresh your memory regarding relevant formulas and how to use them in calculations. Also refresh your memory regarding the four operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division) as well as regarding conversion of percentages to fractions and vice versa (e.g. 25% = ¼, which means that the price post discount is 75% = ¾ of the original price of £10) and recheck your calculations.

A useful formula for this sort of question is:

percentages sample question 1

Note: The plus or minus sign is determined by the action preformed (increase/decrease). In addition-

percentages sample question 2

In this case:

percentages sample question 3

An alternative approach: The new value after a decrease of 25% is 75% of the original value. In other words, the new value equals:

percentages sample question 4

In this case:

 percentages sample question 5

 

 

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Get the full Pilot PrepPack™, including: timed tests, helpful tips and detailed answer explanations!

 

 

How Can JobTestPrep Help Me Ace the Test?

You will likely apply to many competitive employers and thus take many pilot aptitude tests. Preparing with JobTestPrep’s Pilot Aptitude Test PrepPacks™ will develop your skills to greatly improve your likelihood of being invited for interviews and getting hired.While all pilot aptitude tests focus on the same general sets of skills, there are important differences between tests used by different employers.

JobTestPrep has used feedback from successful job seekers to improve our products and gather information about exactly which kinds of questions appear on tests for competitive employers. That way, you can tailor your studying for the exact companies to which you are applying. Many airlines, such as Easyjet, Cathay Pacific and Aer Lingus, use a style of test called cut-e.  Another common test style is Pilapt. Other airlines such as Quantas use different styles of test.

Our PrepPacks™ stand out because they include full length test simulations, comprehensive explanations for each question, video tutorials and study guides.

Looking for additional practice? Our unique pilot assessment test will give you the edge you need to succeed. By signing up, you will receive access to dozens of preparation materials including mock test simulations, study guides and more. Succeed throughout the pilot aptitude tests and interviews by using our exclusive practice packs.

 

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