Free Watson Glaser Practice Test [2024] - Full Solutions & Tips

We will begin our Watson Glaser practice test with the first Watson Glaser test section – Inference. In this section, each exercise begins with a statement of facts you are to regard as true. After each statement of facts, you will find several possible inferences - that is, conclusions that some people might draw from the stated facts. You'll need to examine each inference separately and decide its degree of truth or falsity.

Free Watson Glaser Practice Tests

  • Inference

Read the following text, and then choose whether each of the statements below is true or false to varying degrees according to the text:

Virtual employees, or employees who work from home via a computer, are an increasing trend. In the US, the number of virtual employees has increased by 39% in the last two years and 74% in the last five years. Employing virtual workers reduces costs and makes it possible to use talented workers no matter where they are located globally. Yet, running a workplace with virtual employees might entail miscommunication and less camaraderie and can be more time-consuming than face-to-face interaction. 

 

Question # 1

The marked advantage of virtual employee hiring is the ability to benefit from the output of unsociable employees without involving them in face-to-face interactions.

  1. True
  2. Probably True
  3. Insufficient Data
  4. Probably False
  5. False

Answer

The correct answer is 'False'.

The words “marked advantage” insinuate that the ability to benefit from unsociable employees is the most significant advantage. However, that advantage is not even mentioned in the text. That means that the answer is either False or Probably False.

The text specifically mentions the benefits of face-to-face meetings on social interaction: “a workplace with virtual employees might entail miscommunication and less camaraderie and can be more time-consuming than face-to-face interaction”. The conclusion, however, refers to the problems it creates, which is negated by the general message of the passage.

 

 Question # 2

Today, a majority of the employees in the US are virtual employees

  1. True
  2. Probably True
  3. Insufficient Data
  4. Probably False
  5. False

Answer

The correct answer is 'Probably False'.

The passage describes an increasing trend of virtual employment hiring. Yet, it is not specified how prevalent this trend has become compared to the entire workforce. There is no confirmation or contradiction of the statement; the first tendency may be to choose 'insufficient data'.

However, in this test section, you can use common sense to choose the right answer. By applying logic to the answer choices, you can surmise that many jobs cannot be done virtually and that despite the increasing popularity of this trend, it is unlikely that a majority of most US are virtual.

 

 Question # 3

A new study proves that scores on cognitive ability tests, which include critical thinking tests, are strongly related to success in both civilian and military jobs and predict outcomes in all jobs. The added value of these tests, the authors conclude, is that they predict what an individual can do now and the extent to which an individual is likely to learn and develop. Nowadays, occupational psychologists use cognitive ability tests more often than in the past.

  1. True
  2. Probably True
  3. Insufficient Data
  4. Probably False
  5. False

Answer

The correct answer is 'Insufficient Data'.

The passage presents information about a new possible utility for cognitive ability tests in the occupational consultancy area. Yet, we lack information about the extent of past and present use of these tests; hence, it is impossible to determine and even to assume whether the statement is correct or not. Therefore, the correct answer is 'Insufficient Data'.

Watson Glaser Test Tip: An inference is a conclusion a person can draw from certain observed or supposed facts. Sometimes, in deciding whether an inference is true or false, you must use certain commonly accepted knowledge or information that practically every person holds. Do not hesitate to use such knowledge, but on the other hand – never rely on such knowledge as the basis for judging an inference to be True or False. These rulings must be supported by the statement of facts given. 

Many more Inference practice questions – in full simulations or as additional practice, with additional, comprehensive guides for tips and solving techniques, can be found in our Watson Glaser Test PrepPack.

The next section in the Watson Glaser test is Assumptions. It is comprised of several statements. Several proposed assumptions follow each statement. You are to decide for each assumption whether a person, in making the given statement, is really making that assumption – that is, taking it for granted, justifiably or not. Notice that these assumptions do not have to concur with reality or reason – you are not judging their common sense but plainly whether they are made.


 

  • Assumptions

Question # 4

"Increasing the number of employees in the department will increase its business performance."

Proposed Assumption:

It is possible to predict the impact of department size on business performance.

  1. Assumption Made
  2. Assumption Not Made

Answer

The correct answer is ‘Assumption Made’.

To see why the assumption is made, let’s use the Negative Test algorithm:

Step #1 – negate the assumption – “It is impossible to predict the impact of department size on business performance.”

Step #2 – check if the validity of the original statement changes. In our case, it does, since if there is no way to measure the effect of department size on business performance, any statement trying to predict such an effect is meaningless.

Step #3 – if the statement is not valid anymore, then the assumption was made.

 

Question # 5

"In the event of a warmer planet due to global warming, we will need to develop a drought-resistant grass species."

Proposed Assumption:

World climate is changing.

  1. Assumption Made
  2. Assumption Not Made

Answer

The correct answer is ‘Assumption Not Made’.

The actual assumption is that the future holds a possibility for climate change. It is not evident that it is already happening from the text. Remember, you should not make your decision based on whether you think the assumption is true but only based on whether or not the assumption was made.

 

 Question # 6

"I am flying to China next week. I want to be sure to avoid website blocking due to internet censorship policies, so I better ask our IT team to install a satellite-based modem on my laptop."

Proposed Assumption:

By getting a satellite-based modem, I decrease the chances of experiencing website blocking.

  1. Assumption Made
  2. Assumption Not Made

Answer

The correct answer is ‘Assumption Made’.

The second sentence presents a possible problem I might encounter in China. The third sentence presents a technical solution. Under reasonable doubt, one can conclude that the third sentence offers a solution to the possible problem. Without the above assumption, we couldn't connect the second and the third sentence.

Watson Glaser Test Tip: An assumption is something presupposed or taken for granted. If you think the given assumption is taken for granted in the statement, mark the option Assumption Made. If you think the assumption is not necessarily taken for granted in the statement, mark the option Assumption Not Made. Remember to judge each assumption independently.

Many more Assumptions practice questions – in full simulations or as additional practice, with additional, comprehensive guides for tips and solving techniques, can be found in our Watson Glaser Test Practice PrepPack. For a price starting at 39$, you can buy our comprehensive PrepPack, which can guarantee a substantial improvement before the Watson Glaser test.

 

What is the Best Way to Study for the Watson Glaser Test?

Watson Glaser is generally considered one of the more difficult assessment tests. The first challenge is that the test focuses primarily on evaluating a single characteristic: critical thinking. This is accomplished using five different strategies and questions, and passing the test requires completing all five successfully. Another challenge of the WGCTA exam is that it employs tactics to deceive and mislead test-takers, undermining intuition and knowledge. 

To overcome these challenges, it is essential to prepare for each section of the test, familiarise yourself with all the question types, fully understand the precise rules of each test section, and practice accordingly. Our Watson Glaser Test Practice PrepPack includes numerous accurate simulations of the real exam, practice tests, and study materials, which will enable you to familiarise yourself with the time constraints, formatting, and content of the actual test. This will help you practice under realistic conditions and become confident in your answer-solving abilities so that when the time comes, you will be able to answer the questions quickly and accurately and therefore score higher.

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The next section in the Watson-Glaser test is Deduction. In this section, each exercise consists of several premises followed by several suggested conclusions. For the purposes of this test, consider the premises in each exercise to be true without exception. Read each conclusion. If you think it necessarily follows from the premises, mark the option Conclusion Follows. If you think it is not a necessary conclusion from the premises or that the conclusion does not concur with the premises, mark the option Conclusion Does Not Follow.


 

  • Deductive

Question # 7

Only technological companies are listed on the OTX stock market. No technological company remains unstable for a long period of time.

Proposed Conclusion:

If your company is listed on OTX, it will not be unstable for a long time.

  1. Conclusion Follows
  2. Conclusion Does Not Follow

Answer

The correct answer is ‘Conclusion Follows’.

We are going to solve these questions intuitively. However, it is strongly advised to use other, safer methods in the actual Watson Glaser test, such as Venn diagrams or Letter Coding. 

We know two facts:

  • Only technological companies are listed on the OTX. This is equivalent to: All companies listed on the OTX are technological.
  • No technological company remains unstable for a long period of time. This is equivalent to: All technological companies are not unstable for a long period of time.

Combining these two facts, it is easy to see that all companies on the OTX will not be unstable for a long period of time.

 

Question # 8

No millionaire who lives in a city has less than two cars. Nonetheless, some but not all the inhabitants of Ergfort city have two cars or more.

Proposed Conclusion:

A place where none of the inhabitants has two cars or more has no millionaires.

  1. Conclusion Follows
  2. Conclusion Does Not Follow

Answer

The correct answer is: ‘Conclusion Does Not Follow’.

Millionaire = A, lives in a city = B, has less than two cars = C, any living place = D.
According to the premises, (no A + B -> C), which equals (A + B -> ~C), and (BErgfort + ~C)*some but not all.

The conclusion states (D + C) -> ~A.

B is a subgroup of D (a city is a kind of place). Rules that apply to B do not necessarily apply to D. This is a generalization.
At first, it may be tempting to think that if no one in D has two cars or more, then there are no

millionaires there. However, the first premise only discussed millionaires in cities. You know nothing about millionaires in general. Therefore, the conclusion does not follow.

 

Question # 9

There are 20 employees in our office; each drinks between 0 to 4 cups of coffee a day. This costs the company $100 per week (5 working days).

Proposed Conclusion:

Some employees drink 15 cups of coffee a week.

  1. Conclusion Follows
  2. Conclusion Does Not Follow

Answer

The correct answer is: ‘Conclusion Does Not Follow’

According to the premises, (20 employees)*.
When a range is given as data, both limits must appear at least once (both must exist). So:
0 ≤ coffee cups ≤ 4; (employee + 0 cups)*; (employee + 4 cups)*.

The conclusion states ~*(5 cups a day)

The conclusion would follow if you knew every possibility in the range exists (that is, that at least one employee drinks 0 cups a day, at least one employee drinks 1 cup a day, and at least one employee drinks 2 cups a day, etc.), in which case the employees who drink 3 cups of coffee a day would drink 15 cups a week. But you don’t know that. All you know is that the limits of the range exist.

Watson Glaser Test Tip While deciding, you should rely only on the premises, even though you may believe some conclusions may or may not be true according to your general knowledge. Try not to let your prejudices influence your judgment - stick to the premises and judge each conclusion as to whether it necessarily follows from the premises or not.

Many more Deduction practice questions – in full simulations or as additional practice, with additional, comprehensive guides for tips and solving techniques, can be found in our Watson Glaser Test PrepPack. 

 

The next section in the Watson Glaser test is Interpretation. In this section, assume that everything in the short paragraph is true. The problem is to judge whether each of the proposed conclusions logically follows beyond a reasonable doubt from the information given in the paragraph. If you think that the proposed conclusion follows beyond a reasonable doubt (even though it may not follow absolutely and necessarily), then mark it as Conclusion Follows. If you think that the conclusion does not follow beyond a reasonable doubt from the facts given, then mark it as Conclusion Does Not Follow. 


 

  • Interpretation

Question # 10

I have a nine-month-old baby at home, and she usually agrees to be put to bed, where she falls asleep promptly. But every time her grandparents visit in the evening, she cries when I put her to bed, and she continues to cry for an hour.

Proposed Conclusion:

My baby’s difficulty is mostly physiological—her grandparents give her chocolates to eat, and the sugar makes her hyperactive.

  1. Conclusion Follows
  2. Conclusion Does Not Follow

Answer

The correct answer is: ‘Conclusion Does Not Follow’.

The conclusion proposes a reason that is neither given explicitly in the text nor probable beyond a reasonable doubt. It provides an explanation that stems from our own personal perceptions.

 

 

Question # 11

Ten years ago, not a single Australian city was in the top 50 most expensive cities in the world. Today, three are in the top 15. You can feel it just by looking at the small stuff. A single lime, for example, costs $1.50, 300% more than it cost ten years ago.

Proposed Conclusion:

A single lime in Australia cost $0.50 ten years ago.

  1. Conclusion Follows
  2. Conclusion Does Not Follow

Answer

The correct answer is: ‘Conclusion Does Not Follow’.

The logic behind this answer is mathematical: a 300% increase is, in fact, equal to an increase by a factor of four. If a lime costs $1.50 today, which is an increase of 300% in price compared to ten years ago, then ten years ago, it was worth $0.375.

Previous price X 4 = 1.5, so 1.5 ÷ 4 = previous price = 0.375.

When something increases by 100%, it is actually multiplied by 2, so you need to divide the current cost by 4 and not 3. When something increases by 200%, it is multiplied by 3. So, when something increases by 300%, it is multiplied by 4.

 

Question # 12

Studies conducted over the last 60 years show that adult obesity and the direct medical cost thereof have increased steadily worldwide. The last decade has had the highest rates of both these trends.

Proposed Conclusion:

Humankind, as a whole, has not advanced much in the ability to maintain optimal body weight.

  1. Conclusion Follows
  2. Conclusion Does Not Follow

Answer

The correct answer is: ‘Conclusion Does Not Follow’.

Even though obesity rates have increased worldwide, we cannot conclude anything regarding advancement. Advancements usually refer to fields of technology and medicine. It is possible that there have been advancements in those fields, but obesity has increased because of poor nutrition and a decrease in active lifestyles. Therefore, the conclusion does not follow.

Watson Glaser Test Tip Despite having the same format as the Deduction section, Interpretation requires not only following the information provided but also applying logic, as it can be marked as follows if it is beyond a reasonable doubt. Many more Interpretation practice questions – in full simulations or as additional practice, with additional, comprehensive guides for tips and solving techniques, can be found in our Watson Glaser PrepPack.

The final section in the Watson Glaser test is Arguments. In making decisions about important questions, it is desirable to be able to distinguish between arguments that are strong and arguments that are weak, as far as the question at issue is concerned. For an argument to be strong, it must be both important and directly related to the question. An argument is weak if it is not directly related to the question (even though it may be of great general importance), if it is of minor importance, or if it is related only to trivial aspects of the question.


 

  • Arguments

Decide whether each of the arguments is strong or weak:

Question # 13

Should a company grant employees free time to spend in any manner they choose?

Proposed Argument:

No—employees are likely to use their free time to clean their homes, run errands, and meet with friends, and thus bring no benefit to the company whatsoever.

  1. Strong Argument
  2. Weak Argument

Answer

The correct answer is: ‘Strong Argument’.

This argument is both relevant to the topic and important.

  • It is important, as it refers to the benefit the company might (or might not) get from this policy.
  • It is relevant, as it addresses the issue itself – the free time given to employees and its consequences.

Note that the trivial details provided ("...clean their homes, run errands, and meet with friends...") are a distractor intended to make the issue seem trivial – however, they do not change the relevance or importance of the given argument. 

 

Question # 14

When grading tests, should teachers consider that some of their students have native-born parents and other students have immigrant parents?

Proposed Argument:

No. Although some teachers may be sympathetic to students from immigrant families with financial difficulties, their grading should reflect the students’ work and abilities, regardless of ethnic or financial background.

  1. Strong Argument
  2. Weak Argument

Answer

The correct answer is: ‘Strong Argument’

Whether you agree with this argument or not, you must consider it true. As such, it is strong. It both relates to the question directly and raises an important claim that grades should reflect someone’s merits and not take into account factors such as ethnicity or socioeconomic background.

 

Question # 15

Should the government use software solutions designed to track online behaviors on social networks in order to prevent threats to national security?

Proposed Argument:

Yes—national security is of high enough importance to justify the violation of civil liberties and freedom of thought.

  1. Strong Argument
  2. Weak Argument

Answer

The correct answer is: ‘Strong Argument’

Here you have a reference to the ethical problems involved in data mining in which, unlike in the first question in this set, the ethical aspect is presented in relation to the main question - preventing national security threats. In other words, this argument is related to the question, and the consequence it described is important. For this reason, it is a strong argument.

Watson Glaser Test Tip This final section assesses your ability to make decisions regarding importance and relevancy while applying logic. Many more Arguments practice questions – in full simulations or as additional practice, with additional, comprehensive guides for tips and solving techniques, can be found in our Watson Glaser PrepPack.

Now that you're familiarised with the different Watson Glaser psychometric test sections and you have been introduced to different solving techniques, it is time to begin your practice. Reading comprehensive guides with specific techniques and all different sub-questions and then practising multiple times for each section in narrow time frames to reach a high score in the real test will increase your ability like nothing else.

The recommended score to pass is 80% - which is 33-34 minimum correct answers. Without knowledge of all solving techniques and tips, and methodical practice, it is very difficult to achieve high scores. For a price starting at 39$, you can buy our comprehensive PrepPack, which can guarantee a substantial improvement before the test.

For other law firm pre-employment tests, check out our page on the Suited Assessment.


 

Our Watson Glaser PrepPack includes comprehensive preparation materials, including:

  • A Watson Glaser Diagnostic Test that will let you get an initial familiarity with the test and know where you stand in each section. Afterwards, you will receive a detailed analysis of the sections you struggled with, enabling you to focus on the key skills you need to improve. 
  • 23 Additional Practice Tests covering all the topics and sections you'll face in the Watson Glaser Exam. You'll be able you use these practice tests to thoroughly practice the issues you are weaker on, as revealed in the Diagnostic Test.
  • 2 Full-Length Watson Glaser Test Simulations will allow you to practice the actual test's time constraints, formatting, and content and determine whether you have improved from the Diagnostic Test after practising. 
  • 5 Interactive Study Guides that will give you a professional grasp of the theory behind each test section and the best ways to solve questions. 
 

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