Free UCAT Practice Test With Answers [2024]

Free UCAT Practice Test – Amp Your Performance With UCAT Sample Question [2024]

  • UCAT Decision-Making Test Questions 

  4. Read the following text and answer the question

A kindergarten is arranging the children's birthday schedule.

The following facts are known:

Gabriel is younger than Davis.
Liz is younger than Sarah.
Katie is older than David but younger than Sarah.
Liz is younger than Katie.

Which of the following MUST be true?

A) Liz is older than David

B) Gabriel is the youngest child in the kindergarten

C) Liz is the second youngest child in the kindergarten

D) Katie is the second oldest child in the kindergarten

Answer:

The correct answer is D.

If you arrange the information given in two inequalities:

Gabriel < David < Katie < Sarah

Liz < Katie

You can conclude that Sarah is the oldest child, and since Katie is older than everyone except Sarah, she is the second oldest child.

Since you don't know if Liz is older, younger, or between the ages of David and Gabriel, statements (A), (B), and (C) are all incorrect.

  5. Choose ‘Yes’ if the conclusion follows and ‘No’ if the conclusion does not follow.

Stealing is punishable only if it results in getting caught. Stealing is not punishable when thieves are being careful. Stealing can sometimes result in being caught. Thieves are mostly careful, so they don't get caught.

A) Stealing is unethical.

   1. Yes
   2. No

B) Stealing is punishable when thieves are being careful.

   1. Yes
   2. No

C) Thieves are usually not punished. 

   1. Yes
   2. No

Answer:

A. The correct answer is ‘No.’ You know nothing about the ethical aspect of stealing from the text.

B. The correct answer is ‘No.’ It is stated that stealing is not punishable when thieves are being careful.

C. The correct answer is ‘Yes.’ The statements 'Stealing is not punishable when thieves are being careful' and 'Thieves are mostly careful so they don't get caught” imply that most of the time thieves are not punished.

  6. Considering only the likelihood of waiting and the satisfaction level, is clinic B the better clinic choice?

There are two dental clinics in the neighborhood.

In clinic A, there is a 50% chance of waiting for more than two hours.

About 200 of the 1000 patients who go to clinic B reported waiting less or equal to two hours.

In clinic A, 25 out of 100 patients were satisfied with the service they received. 

In clinic B, three-quarters of the patients were unsatisfied with the service they received.

A) Yes, clinic B's waiting time is shorter.

B) Yes, clinic B's satisfaction level is higher.

C) No, the chance of waiting more than two hours is 50% for clinic A as compared to 80% for clinic B.

D) No, the satisfaction level in clinic A is higher than in clinic B.

Answer:

The correct answer is C

Compare both waiting time and satisfaction level separately for each clinic:

Waiting time –
Clinic A: 50% chance of waiting more than two hours.
Clinic B: 200 out of 1000 patients wait less or equal to two hours = 800 out of 1000 wait more than two hours = 80% wait more than two hours.
In clinic B, the waiting times are longer than in clinic A.

Satisfaction –
Clinic A: 25 out of 100 patients satisfied = a quarter of patients satisfied.
Clinic B: Three-quarters of the patients unsatisfied = a quarter of patients satisfied.
The satisfaction levels are identical in both clinics.

UCAT Tip: For most of the decision-making questions, such as the seating arrangement and the syllogisms, writing down and drawing a diagram of the process presented to you will make it easier for you to reach the correct answer and receive a good UCAT score.

The UCAT Decision-Making section includes 29 questions to be answered in 31 minutes. Despite the fact that each question gives you more time than the previous section, the questions are stand-alone (no information is used for more than one question) and vary in content, with only three of the six topics that can be found in the section being presented here. Practising techniques, improving logical abilities, and raising you UCAT percentile can be achieved using our full UCAT prep course.

Next, we will sample the UCAT Situational Judgement Section. This is probably the most crucial section of the UCAT and has the most impact on receiving a good UCAT score, as it is meant to test your behaviour and values and predict your performance as a physician according to your responses to situations that medical doctors may encounter throughout their careers.

Empathy, decision-making in sight of the patient's well-being, integrity, and many other qualities that a medical doctor is expected to demonstrate are measured in this section. Most applicants fail this part of the test – as it is provided with a unique scoring unaffiliated with the cognitive scoring. Therefore, it is highly recommended to be acquainted with it.


  • UCAT Situational Judgement Test Questions

  13.

Noah is a student who is about to perform a medical procedure on a patient in front of his classmates and a supervisor. Just before the procedure begins, Noah's father informs him by text that his grandfather is in a very bad condition and asks him to contact them as soon as possible. Noah is extremely concerned about this situation and wants to assist his family.

How important is the following consideration for Noah to consider while deciding what to do next?
The patient's safety.

A) Very important

B) Important

C) Of little importance

D) Not important at all

Answer:

Patient care is the most important factor in medicine, so it’s a very important consideration.

  14.

A man complaining about headaches arrives at a medical clinic. Lauren, a junior doctor, treats him. After the treatment, the man continues complaining about the pain, but Lauren finds nothing wrong with him.

How important is the following consideration for Lauren to consider while deciding what to do next?
Lauren wishes to seem like a qualified doctor.

A) Very important

B) Important

C) Of little importance

D) Not important at all

Answer:

It is important for a doctor to have the ability and integrity to admit when they don’t know something. Lauren's desire to prove herself or her appearance in front of the patient is irrelevant, so this consideration is not important at all.

  15.

Laura is a medical resident in the surgical department. After a big accident happened near the hospital, all non-critical surgeries for the day were delayed helping treat new patients who were wounded. Laura is asked to talk to Dave, a patient who has been waiting very nervously for a tumour removal for the past 3 weeks and tell him that his surgery would be delayed to the following day, to first in the morning. The delay wouldn’t further endanger Dave, and Laura comes to his hospital bed to inform him of the delay.

How appropriate is the following response by Laura to this situation?
Ask that Dave return tomorrow morning and wait with his questions until then – since the medical staff is preoccupied with the accident.

A) A very appropriate thing to do

B) Appropriate, but not ideal

C) Inappropriate, but not awful

D) A very inappropriate thing to do

Answer:

This option shows an absolute lack of understanding of Dave's fears and struggles, as he is very nervous before a serious surgical procedure.

It is stated that Dave has waited some time for the surgery and is nervous about it. This option shows no empathy on Laura's behalf – she is expected to tell him the reason for the delay, reassure him that the delay will not endanger him whatsoever, and explain the sudden situation and the critical need for the medical staff to provide aid to the injured from the accident. Also, Laura should allow him to express himself so he can feel acknowledged and verbalize his emotions and struggles. Therefore, it is a very inappropriate thing to do.

UCAT Tip: Read carefully and know which character the question refers to in the scenario. The correct answer may differ according to the character's position within the scenario.

The UCAT Situational Judgement section includes  69 questions to be answered in 26 minutes. Only by looking at the three examples provided can one notice that this section is like nothing seen before. The variety of questions, with different formats and unique scenarios, makes it, by our consideration, the most challenging section. There are 26 seconds to answer each question, which includes reading the scenario, the question, and the answering options, contemplating and responding accordingly.

We believe that the best way to prepare and tackle this section is by learning and practising a unique tool kit– the Doctor's Leadership Principles, which were built and perfected by our behavioural tests’ experts and medical students. Learning about said principles and techniques to utilize them during the test and practising a great variety of scenarios and questions can be done in our full UCAT prep course.

Next, we will sample the Abstract Reasoning section. Highly challenging and tightly timed, this unique section poses a great challenge and requires a set of skills and techniques to succeed.


  • UCAT Abstract Reasoning Test Questions

   10. choose the right answer:

Ucat Abstract Reasoning

Answer:

The correct answer is 4. In this series, a diagonal row composed of small squares is filled in each frame, alternating in grey and black colours. Since the last diagonal line filled in was black, the answer will contain an additional grey diagonal row.

Ucat Abstract Reasoning

11. Which of the following belongs in set B?

Answer:

The correct answer is C.
The rules for set B are as follows:
Every black dot inside the circle represents a white ray that points away from the circle. Each rat has a cloud at its pointy end.
Every white dot inside the circle represents a black ray that points away from the circle. Each ray has a cloud at its pointy end.
The direction or position of the rays and dots does not matter.
Answer (A) is incorrect because the two rays should be black and pointing away from the circle, as there are two white dots.
Answer (B) is incorrect because there should be two white rays and one black ray, as there are two black dots and one white dot.
Answer (D) is incorrect because there should be two black rays and one white ray pointing away from the circle, as there are two white dots and one black dot.
Note that answers (A), (B), and (D) all belong in set A, but you were asked about set B.
Remember, once you’ve found the correct answer, mark it and move on.

Set A

UCAT Abstract Reasoning

Set B

UCAT Abstract Reasoning

12. This shape

belongs to:

A) Set A

B) Set B

C) Neither

Answer:

Set A: When the large star is dotted, there is an odd number of small stars. When it is empty (white), there is an even number of small stars.

Set B: When the large star is striped, there is an even number of small stars, and when it is empty (white), there is an odd number of small stars.

The large star is empty, and the number of small stars is odd (5), thus, the test shape belongs to set B.

UCAT Tip: To identify a set's logic, focus on just two or three squares of the set. Find which rules and logic govern these squares and apply them to the rest of the set to see if they follow the same rules and logic.

The UCAT Abstract Reasoning section includes 50 questions to be answered in 12 minutes. Many consider this section the most difficult among the cognitive part of the UCAT test, which impacts your average UCAT score, as not only is it extremely difficult to answer all questions (or even most of them), but it requires unique skills, changing of question styles and rests after previous sections. Specific answering tips and practice of these abilities, which will help you receive a high UCAT score, can be gained with guides and practice tests in our full UCAT prep course

Once you complete the abstract reasoning section, you will have finished the cognitive part of the UCAT, but the test is far from over. The most unique, broad, and challenging to practice for is next: we are talking about the Situational Judgement section, which you have seen above.

Next, we will be moving on to the quantitative reasoning section. On the real test, this part comes after the decision-making questions, which conclude the verbal section of the test. Now, calculations, numerical word problems, graphs, and tables will test your mathematical abilities in a transition many find quite difficult.


  •  UCAT Quantitative Reasoning Test Questions 

Use the following table to answer the questions:

2005 Results of the 'Daily Magic' Newspaper Global Delivery

  Successfully Delivered Newspapers (Excluding Lost) Per Day Per cent of Newspaper Lost During Delivery Number of Couriers Working Annually
 London  12,504 5%  758
 Sydney  7,704 11%  321
 Paris  8,007 13%  569
 New York  15,600 6%  358
 Milan  3,069 8%  259

  7. How much does it cost to deliver a newspaper successfully in Sydney (excluding lost papers)?

A) 1.2$

B) 1.6$

C) 1.8$

D) 2.2$

E) Cannot Say

Answer:

There is no information about newspaper prices; therefore, we can’t figure out the answer based on the existing data.

The answer is Cannot Say.

  8. Disregarding newspaper loss rates, how many couriers from Sydney would have been needed to deliver the same number of newspapers as in London successfully?

A) 512 Couriers

B) 513 Couriers

C) 521 Couriers

D) 523 Couriers

E) Cannot Say

Answer:

In Sydney, there are 321 couriers delivering 7,704 newspapers successfully.

7704 / 321 = 24 newspapers per courier

In London, 12,504 newspapers are delivered successfully.

Dividing the 12,504 by 24 gives us the number of couriers required for this task:

12,504 / 24 = 521 couriers

The answer is 521 Couriers.

  9. What would Sydney’s lost rate have to be to match the daily number of successful deliveries in Paris?

A) 5%

B) 7.5%

C) 10%

D) 15%

E) They will never match.

Answer:

With a loss rate of 11%, the 7,704 newspapers that are successfully delivered in Sydney make up 89% of the total newspapers delivered (100% -11%).

The total number of deliveries in Sydney (including lost papers) is (7,704 × 100) / 89 = 8,656.

In Paris, 8,007 newspapers are delivered successfully. For Sydney to have the same number of successfully delivered papers, Sydney must lose only 8,656 - 8,007 = 649 newspapers. Therefore, the new Sydney lost rate must be (649 / 8,656) * 100% = 7.5%.

UCAT Tip: There will be questions in which there is no option which is 100% correct. For example, you will notice imprecise decimal figures. In these cases, you need to choose the best, most suitable answer. If you cannot find one, recheck your solution.Keep in mind that any wrong answer will reduce your UCAT percentile.

The UCAT Quantitative Reasoning section includes 36 questions to be answered in 25 minutes. With approx. 41 seconds for each question, techniques such as summarizing information and quick math are essential for success. Master those skills and more while practising a variety of tables and graphs by using our full UCAT prep course, which will guide you how to receive a good UCAT score.

Once completing the quantitative reasoning questions, the last cognitive section will be presented – Abstract Reasoning. This takes numerical and mathematical thinking to a more amorphous level, as we have seen above. As for this free test, it will now move on to the verbal section.


  • UCAT Verbal Reasoning Test Questions

Text I

Lily Beetles (Galercuella Nymphaeae) are extreme water skiers. They can skim across the surface of water so fast that they seem to vanish.

Trying to figure out how they stay on the surface while traveling at speeds of up to 0.5 metres per second, a researcher from Stanford University has filmed the beetles in the lab. Scaled for size, the beetles' speed would be equivalent to a human traveling at about 500km/h.

When a beetle "takes off", it lifts its middle legs, and then angles its body upwards before vigorously flapping its wings to launch itself horizontally, traveling up to a few metres forwards. It moves so fast that it interacts with the ripples generated by its own motion, which increases drag and allows it to jump from ripple to ripple.

Understanding the motion of the beetles could help us develop robots and other vehicles that move across water quickly.

  1. The Lily beetle is the fastest water bug known to science.

A) True

B) False

C)Cannot Say

Answer:

The correct answer is Cannot Say.
Although it is stated in the passage that the Lily beetle is an extremely fast bug, the passage does not mention that it is the fastest one known.

  2. Understanding the motion of Lily beetles can have practical implications

A) True

B) False

C)Cannot Say

Answer:

The correct answer is True.
According to the passage, "Understanding the motion of the beetles could help us develop robots and other vehicles that move across the water quickly.” This understanding has practical implications.

Text II

A study published in the Journal of Psychological Science found that living in greener areas is correlated with higher levels of mental well-being and life satisfaction. The study used data from a national survey that followed more than 5,000 households and 10,000 adults between 1991 and 2008 as they moved around the country. The researchers accounted for changes over time in participants' income, employment, marital status, physical health, and housing type. The results showed that living in an urban area with high levels of green space can significantly positively impact well-being, equivalent to a third of the impact of being married. 

Beth Murphy, a local manager in a mental health institution, said: "For people living busy lifestyles in densely populated areas, being able to get outdoors and access green space is a great way to escape the stresses of day-to-day life." This research is important to psychologists, public health officials, and urban planners interested in learning about the effects of urbanization and city planning on population health and wellbeing.

  3. What conclusion can be drawn from the passage?

A) People in densely populated areas have poor health.

B) Marriage does not have a significant impact on well-being.

C) The positive impact of green spaces is moderated by physical health.

D) Not all people have access to green areas.

Answer:

The correct answer is D.

The question requires us to make inferences from the information given in the passage. In addition, it does not refer us to a specific section of the text. Therefore, it is recommended to work with the statements themselves and locate them in the text (trying to confirm or refute them) instead of vice versa.

Statement D states, ' A study … found that living in greener areas correlates with higher levels of mental well-being and life satisfaction.’ The study gives us reason to infer that green spaces are not accessible to all people, as not everyone is able to achieve such conditions.

The full-length text and questions, which resemble the actual test, can be found below.

UCAT Tip: The UCAT verbal reasoning subtest has two types of questions – true/false/cannot tell and free text questions. Although the true/false/cannot tell might seem the easy ones, in fact, they are trickier because you need to be 100% sure that your conclusion lies within the text and that you do not rely on your assumptions or previous information. A not-text-based question can significantly affect your UCAT percentile. 

The UCAT Verbal Reasoning section includes 44 questions to be answered in 21 minutes. Long and varying texts, with the addition of fewer than 30 seconds for each question, make the section very difficult to answer in full. Mastering verbal skills, inference abilities, and specific techniques for shortening answering time will drastically raise your UCAT average score and can be achieved using our full UCAT prep course.

Once completing the Verbal Reasoning section, you will move on to the Decision-Making section. Unlike the verbal questions, which are focused on large concepts of the text, the decision-making section focus on small details.

What is the Best Way to Study for the UCAT?

The difficulty of getting a high score on the UCAT stems from the complexity of the questions and the relatively short time to answer them. The time pressure is most prominent in the verbal reasoning section, where you must read and answer 44 challenging questions in 40 seconds each! Therefore, more than practising and improving your reading comprehension and logical skills, intelligent time management is crucial for completing the UCAT test.

Our experience has taught us that the closer the practice is to the actual test, the more significantly it improves your score. Our UCAT PrepPack features a diagnostic test and two UCAT simulations, each containing 5 sections: Verbal Reasoning, Decision Making, Quantitative Reasoning, Abstract Reasoning and Situational Judgement Test in the exact order, difficulty and time limits of the actual test.

In addition to taking actual test simulations, our UCAT PrepPack offers multiple focused practice tests and comprehensive study guides for every subject to teach you solving techniques and time-saving strategies. Through these specialized prep materials, you will get used to the pressure and see clear improvements until you get a high score to stand out above the competition.

With our UCAT preparation pack, available for only £79, you can ensure you are at your best when you take the UCAT and get the high score you deserve.



Our PrepPack includes comprehensive preparation material, including:

  1. A Diagnostic test that assesses your initial abilities and helps create a more focused preparation.
  2. 36 cognitive practice tests, with an individual guide for each section.
  3. Comprehensive SJT preparation, with hundreds of questions from various scenarios, including our Doctor's Principles Guide and a medical doctor-oriented personality test.
  4. 2 full UCAT with extensive explanations.
  5. Additional study guides.

Did you get all the questions right? JobTestPrep’s complete UCAT preparation pack includes a UCAT question bank, full UCAT mock tests, study guides, video tutorials and specific practice for each UCAT type of question with detailed solutions. This will allow you to increase your speed and accuracy on UCAT test day, get an above-average UCAT score and become a medical student.  

Full Solution to Question 3
The question requires us to make inferences from the information given in the passage. In addition, it does not refer us to a specific section of the text. Therefore it is recommended to work with the statements themselves and locate them in the text (trying to confirm or refute them) instead of vice versa.
Statement A: ‘Beth Murphy…said: "For people living busy lifestyles in densely populated areas, being able to get outdoors and access green space is a great way to escape the stresses of day-to-day life"'. Murphy does not indicate that people who live in densely populated areas have poor health.
Statement B:‘Dr. White…compared the scale of the effects of living in a greener area to "big-hitting" life events such as marriage.’ Namely, marriage is considered to have a significant impact on people.
Statement C:‘This was true even after the researchers accounted for changes over time in participants' income, employment, marital status, physical health and housing type.’ In other words, the positive impact of green spaces is not moderated by physical health.
Statement D:‘…these kinds of comparisons are important for policymakers when trying to decide how to invest scarce public resources.’ The study itself, together with the words of Dr. White, gives us reason to infer that green spaces are not accessible to all people. That is the reason it is so important to prove their positive effects and to influence policymakers to invest more money in them.

Therefore, the statement that logically follows from the passage is statement D.

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