NAPLAN Results

NAPLAN results are reported directly to schools from mid-August to mid-September. The NAPLAN individual student reports contain information about a student's achievements and performance in the fields of numeracy, reading, writing, and language conventions. The report also compares the student's performance with that of other students in the same year group, the national average, and the national minimum.

The NAPLAN individual student report shows the student's results for each of the four areas tested on a common assessment scale.

The common assessment scale has ten bands, but only uses the relevant six bands for each year level:

  • Year 3 student reports show bands 1 to 6. The national minimum standard is band 2.
  • Year 5 student reports show bands 3 to 8. The national minimum standard is band 4.
  • Year 7 student reports show bands 4 to 9. The national minimum standard is band 5.
  • Year 9 student reports show bands 5 to 10. The national minimum standard is band 6.

For example:

  • Year 3 student with results in band 1 scored below the national minimum standards.
  • Year 3 student with results in band 2 scored at the national minimum standards.
  • Year 3 student with results in band 3 scored at the middle 60% of year 3 students in Australia.
  • Year 3 student with results in band 4 scored at the national average.
  • Year 3 student with results in band 5 performed above the national average.
  • Year 3 student with results in band 6 performed well above the expected level of achievement for a year 3 student.

 


How Are the NAPLAN Results Used?

Schools use the NAPLAN results to identify areas of strengths and weaknesses. The NAPLAN results illustrate students' strengths and weaknesses with clarity, helping both teachers and parents to identify areas of improvement and address them. Teachers review the results to offer the students the extra practice and instruction they need to be successful, while parents can develop a plan with their child's teachers to help him or her improve even more. The NAPLAN is not a pass/fail test, and both students and parents are encouraged to use the results to track the student's progress.

Some schools may use the NAPLAN results as part of the admission process for secondary schools or for changing schools.


NAPLAN Dates 2017

Students are given several days to take the NAPLAN:

  • Students taking the NAPLAN online test will be tested between the 9th and the 19th of May.
  • Students taking the NAPLAN paper test will be tested between the 9th and the 11th of May.

Students who were absent during any of the testing days may complete missed tests at another time during the testing week.


NAPLAN Writing Marking Guide

Assessors use the same NAPLAN writing marking guide to ensure the score is standardised and to allow for national comparison of the students' writing.


NAPLAN Persuasive Writing Marking Guide

The NAPLAN Pesruasive Essay marking guide as well as advice on how to earn the highest scores is listed below:

Marking Criterion

Description of persuasive writing marking criterion

Score

Audience

The writer’s capacity to orient, engage, and persuade the reader

0–6

Text structure

The organisation of the structural components of a persuasive text (introduction, body, and conclusion) into an appropriate and effective text structure

0–4

Ideas

The selection, relevance, and elaboration of ideas for a persuasive argument

0–5

Persuasive devices

The use of a range of persuasive devices to enhance the writer’s position and persuade the reader

0–4

Vocabulary

The range and precision of contextually appropriate language choices

0–5

Cohesion

The control of multiple threads and relationships across the text, achieved through the use of grammatical elements (referring words, text connectives, conjunctions) and lexical elements (substitutions, repetitions, word associations)

0–4

Paragraphing

The segmenting of text into paragraphs that assist the reader in following the line of argument

0–3

Sentence structure

The production of grammatically correct, structurally sound, and meaningful sentences

0–6

Punctuation

The use of correct and appropriate punctuation to aid the reading of the text

0–5

Spelling

The accuracy of spelling and the difficulty of the words used

0–6

  • Audience: Students wishing to earn a score of a six should demonstrate control of the reader/writer relationship by establishing a strong, credible voice; influencing the reader through the use of effective persuasive devices and precise language; and considering the reader's views and possible opinions. Writers should establish a connection with the reader, communicate values and attitudes, and persuade using tenor. While crafting an argument, writers should appeal to reason, emotions, and cultural values. But they should also challenge the reader's opinions and acknowledge that opposition.
  • Text structure: Students wishing to earn a score of four should write a complete and coherent argument while developing all of its components. The introduction should contain a clear position statement, the body should include reasons and evidence to support the argument, and the conclusion should reinforce the writer's position. The conclusion may also reflect on the issue in question or suggest a solution.
  • Ideas: Students wishing to earn a score of five should generate rich insights, written in a highly persuasive manner. Such ideas many include benefits to the group as a whole, a reflection on universal issues, or a consideration of the wider world. Students may elaborate on their argument by discussing arguments for and against their stated position, refute opinions that oppose their own, and explain relationships of cause and effect.
  • Persuasive Devices: Students wishing to earn a score of four should use a range of persuasive devices effectively throughout their argument. Those devices should be appropriate to the style of the argument and aim to appeal to the reader's values, reason, or emotions. Note that to earn a four, students should submit at least one page of writing.
  • Vocabulary: Students wishing to earn a score of five should utilise a range of precise and effective diction that matches the style of the argument. This requirement applies to both content words and grammar class words. Such words may include modal adjectives, adverbs, and groups; precise words and word groups; technical vocabulary; nominalisations; and various forms of figurative language. Note that to earn a five, students should submit at least one page of writing.
  • Cohesion: Students wishing to earn a score of four should correctly utilise a range of coherent devices to enhance reading and support their argument. Those devices may include referring words, ellipsis, text connectives, substitutions, and word associations. Note that to earn a four, students should submit at least one page of writing.
  • Paragraphing: Students wishing to earn a score of three should structure their essay to direct the reader’s attention and enhance their argument. Single sentences may be used to emphasise a certain aspect of the argument. Students should use the accepted conventions to indicate the start of a new paragraph.
  • Sentence Structure: Students wishing to earn a score of six should write correct, well-developed sentences (an occasional slip is allowed). Sentences should express precise meaning and be effectively persuasive. Students should also demonstrate an understanding of a wide range of sentence structures by using different clause types and patterns, varying length and rhythm, and employing increased elaboration and extension. Note that to write effective sentences, students should use punctuation appropriately. Run-on sentences, verb mistakes, and prepositions errors are considered sentence errors.
  • Punctuation: Students wishing to earnascoreoffiveshoulddisplayaccurate and appropriate use of punctuation. That includes the appropriate use of:
    • Capitalisation
    • Full stops, question marks, and exclamation marks to end a sentence
    • Commas in a list, as phrase and clause markers, and within quotation marks
    • Apostrophes for contractions and possession
    • Quotation marks, brackets, dashes, colons, and semicolons
    • Points of ellipsis
  • Spelling: Students wishing to earn a score of six should correctly spell all words and include at least ten difficult as well as some challenging words in their essay.  

 


NAPLAN Narrative Writing Marking Guide

The NAPLAN Narrative essay marking guide as well as advice on how to earn the highest scores is listed below:

Marking criterion

Description of narrative writing marking criterion

Score

Audience

The writer’s capacity to orient, engage, and affect the reader

0–6

Text structure

The organisation of narrative features—including orientation, complication, and resolution—into an appropriate and effective text structure

0–4

Ideas

The creation, selection, and crafting of ideas for a narrative

0–5

Character and setting

Character: the portrayal and development of character

Setting: the development of a sense of place, time, and atmosphere

0–4

Vocabulary

The range and precision of contextually appropriate language choices

0–5

Cohesion

The control of multiple threads and relationships across the text, achieved through the use of grammatical elements (referring words, text connectives, conjunctions) and lexical elements (substitutions, repetitions, word associations)

0–4

Paragraphing

The segmenting of text into paragraphs that assist the reader to negotiate the narrative

0–2

Sentence structure

The production of grammatically correct, structurally sound, and meaningful sentences

0–6

Punctuation

The use of correct and appropriate punctuation to aid the reading of the text

0–5

Spelling

The accuracy of spelling and the difficulty of the words used

0–6

  • Audience: Students wishing to earn a score of six should consider and appeal to the reader's expectations and values while aiming to affect the reader using precise language, diction, and narrative devices. Narrative devices may include genres, sub genres, and intertextual references. Language choices may be used to reveal values, create and monitor reader/writer relationship, establish narrator stance, subvert expectations, encourage an emotional response or reflection, and display irony.
  • Text Structure: Students wishing to earn a score of four should write a controlled and complete narrative using effective plot devices. Students should provide a coherent structure that includes an effective ending. Plot devices may include foreshadowing, flashback, red herring, cliffhanger, coda, twist, evaluation, reflection, and circular or parallel plots.
  • Ideas: Students wishing to earn a score of five should utilise ideas generated to reflect a certain theme and to support the story line. Those ideas may include psychological subjects, unexpected topics, mature viewpoints, elements of popular culture, satirical perspectives, extended metaphor, and traditional sub-genre subjects.
  • Character and setting: Students wishing to earn a score of four should utilise details to create effective and distinct characterisation, setting, and atmosphere. In addition, dialogue, introspection, and reaction may also be utilised as means of characterisation. Note that the narrative may focus on one aspect more than another. Many texts, however, display a balance of the two components.
  • Vocabulary: Students wishing to earn a score of five should use a range of precise diction that is appropriate to the genre chosen in a mature and articulate manner. Students may also use rhetorical devices such as simile, metaphor, alliteration, and personification. This requirement applies to both content words and grammar class words.
  • Cohesion: Students wishing to earn a score of four should correctly utilise a range of coherent devices to enhance reading and support their narrative. Those devices should link ideas and enhance continuity within the text.
  • Paragraphing: Students wishing to earn a score of two should structure their narrative to pace and direct the reader's attention. Each paragraph should focus on one idea or a set of similar ideas to enhance the narrative. Note that a single sentence may be used for emphasis. Students should use the accepted conventions to indicate the start of a new paragraph.
  • Sentence Structure: Students wishing to earn a score of six should write correct, well-developed sentences (an occasional slip is allowed). Sentences should express precise meaning effectively. Students should also demonstrate an understanding of a wide range of sentence structures by using different clause types and patterns, varying length and rhythm, and employing increased elaboration and extension. Note that to write effective sentences, students should use punctuation appropriately. Run-on sentences, verb mistakes, and prepositions errors are considered sentence errors.
  • Punctuation: Students wishing to earn a score of fiveshoulddisplayaccurate and appropriate use of punctuation. That includes the appropriate use of:
    • Capitalisation
    • Full stops, question marks, and exclamation marks to end a sentence
    • Commas in a list, as phrase and clause markers, and within quotation marks
    • Apostrophes for contractions and possession
    • Quotation marks, hyphens, brackets, dashes, colons, and semicolons
    • Dialogue conventions
  • Spelling: Students wishing to earn a score of a six should correctly spell all words and include at least ten difficult as well as some challenging words in their essay.

 


NAPLAN Practice Tests – Online

The NAPLAN results illustrate students' strengths and weaknesses with clarity, helping both teachers and parents to identify areas of improvement and address them. Mastery of problematic concepts is necessary to ensure students are prepared for the next grade, college, and their careers. Since the NAPLAN scores are more than likely to influence your child's future, it is highly important to prepare for the test.

JobTestPrep offers online NAPLAN practice packs containing NAPLAN practice tests, study guides, and in-depth answer explanations. Start preparing today.


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